Information for Homeowners



Frequently Asked Questions - Commonly asked questions about the emerald ash borer.

Ash Tree Identification and Management


Managing Emerald Ash Borer: Decision Guide

2016 - A step-by-step guide to help you manage your ash trees.

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Ash Tree Identification Bulletin

2005 - Kimberly Rebek and Mary Wilson - criteria to properly identify ash trees.

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Distinguishing Ash from other Common Trees

Is this an ash tree? This key is intended to help you distinguish ash from other common landscape trees, including elm, boxelder, mountain ash, walnut and hickory.

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Coalition for Urban Ash Tree Conservation - EAB Management Statement

Canadian Letter of Support

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Find an Arborist

Find an arborist to treat trees infected by EAB

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Minnesota EAB Waste Utilization Fact Sheet

The Mulch Store has four Minnesota Department of Agriculture (MDA) certified sites to process ash tree waste.

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My Ash Tree is Dead... Now What Do I Do?

March 2007 - Tips outlined to utilize the wood from the dead and dying trees in homeowner's yards.

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Emerald Ash Borer Identification


Signs and Symptoms of the Emerald Ash Borer

Updated December 2005 - Photos showing signs of emerald ash borer. Pros and cons of insecticide treatment options.

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Native Borers and Emerald Ash Borer Look-Alikes

February 2005 - Photos of insects that look like emerald ash borer

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Do Not be Fooled by Emerald Ash Borer Look-Alikes!

Distinguish between these beetles that could be confused with emerald ash borer.

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Emerald Ash Borer Control and Insecticide Options


Emerald Ash Borer Management Options (Iowa State University Extension and Outreach, 2017)

This publication explains what works best as preventive treatments for healthy ash trees planted along streets or in yards or parks.

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Emerald Ash Borer Management Options (Iowa State University Extension and Outreach, 2017) (Spanish)

This publication explains what works best as preventive treatments for healthy ash trees planted along streets or in yards or parks.

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Insecticide Options for Protecting Ash Trees from Emerald Ash Borer

April 2019 - The most current, up-to-date information and research on if, when, and how to treat ash trees is available in this bulletin.

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EAB Insecticides: Label Guidance for Use Limits

February 2012 - From the Minnesota Department of Agriculture - Some insecticides used to control emerald ash borer (EAB) have annual per acre use limits. The Minnesota Department of Agriculture (MDA) offers this label guidance to help applicators and others comply with label directions, meet tree treatment objectives, and minimize environmental impacts. The MDA completed a special registration review of EAB insecticides in 2011. The review concluded that insecticides commonly used to control EAB are not likely to harm human health or the environment when used according to label directions.

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Frequently Asked Questions Regarding Potential Side Effects of EAB Insecticides

February 2011 - Research and Extension Specialists from Michigan State University, the Ohio State University OARDC and Extension, and University of Minnesota Extension have put together a comprehensive publication that addresses questions and concerns regarding insecticide use to control emerald ash borer.

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After Emerald Ash Borer


General Information

My Ash Tree is Dead... Now What Do I Do?

March 2007 - Tips outlined to utilize the wood from the dead and dying trees in homeowner's yards.

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Colorado

Colorado Tree Coalition

The Colorado Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architecture, Colorado Nursery & Greenhouse Association, Colorado Tree Coalition and Colorado State University Extension have compiled a Front Range Tree Recommendation List to help choose the right tree for specific areas.

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Indiana

Alternative Tree Selections - Indiana DNR

Alternative Tree Selections - Indiana DNR

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Illinois

Tree Species Options for Illinois/Michigan - Illinois Dept. of Agriculture

Tree Species Options for Illinois/Michigan - Illinois Dept. of Agriculture

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Replacement options for Ash trees - Chicago Botanic Garden

Replacement options for Ash trees - Chicago Botanic Garden

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Michigan

Alternative Tree Species Selection

This guide gives suggestions for species that should be considered in situations where a homeowner, landscape, or urban forester may have planted an ash in the past in Michigan\'s lower peninsula

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Minnesota

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Reforestation options for EAB - City of Minnetonka Natural Resources Division

Reforestation options for EAB - City of Minnetonka Natural Resources Division

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Nebraska

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ReTree for Nebraskas "Good Trees for the Good Life"

To promote species diversity, ReTree Nebraska has chosen a select group of preferred species that perform well in Nebraska but aren't widely planted. ReTree Nebraska's Good Trees for the Good Life helps Nebraskans choose the right tree for their landscape.

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Ohio

Ash Replacements for Urban and Woodland Plantings

2005 - OSU Ash Alert - In developing this guide for selecting tree species to use to replace ash, it was assumed that, if not for emerald ash borer, one or more of the ash species would be suitable for the planting. Tree species included in this guide, therefore, are generally of the same size as ash and grow well on sites suitable for one or more of the native ash species. You will not, for example, find tree species in this guide that grow to a maximum height of 25 feet and which would be suitable for planting under utility power lines, as ash would not be an appropriate tree for such a planting.

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Wisconsin

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Wisconsin Alternatives to Ash Trees

For information on alternatives to ash trees see the two links below (courtesy of Dr. Laura G. Jull, UW-Madison Dept. of Horticulture):

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This Website provides reliable, objective and timely information from researchers, personnel affiliated with numerous universities, state and federal agencies, educators and outreach specialists in the USA and Canada. Information is reviewed and approved by the website content managers and researchers affiliated with the Michigan State University Dept. of Entomology, the Dept. of Forestry and MSU Extension. Our goal is to help you find answers to questions about EAB, either directly or through links we provide to many other EAB-related websites. Please check this site often because information changes frequently. Funding to support this website is provided by the USDA Forest Service.


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